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BRIEF INTRODUCTIONS



INTRODUCTIONS FROM DIFFERENT ANGLES



Mobbing: a Natural Fact
(Graz lecture, 2007)


 

Chronicle of Higher Education
John Gravois, Mob Rule
Background: Story behind the Story

Essential article by Heinz Leymann, Founder of this Research Area (PDF)

Mobbing as a Factor in Faculty Work Life
(DC, AAUP, 2009)


RECURRENT THEMES IN MOBBING CASES

XMAS
2012
A Clash between Modern and Postmodern Mentalities

KOTLERAS
ARTICLE
The Target's Giftedness (PDF)


Naive Consulting Psychologists
(San Diego, APA, 2010)

BACKGROUND PAPERS ONLINE

 

 

 

 

 

 

WORKPLACE MOBBING
IN ACADEME
DOZENS OF CASE STUDIES

New! Virtual Mobbing, Mellen Press

Friedenberg's Composite — VIDEO
Friedenberg's Composite  —  TEXT

Ottawa's Dismissal of Rancourt

Cho's Massacre at Virginia Tech

  Stephen Berman: Scapegoat

  Math Profs Getting the Boot

  Elliotson's Ouster, London, 1838

Galileo: Archetypal Target

  NYC Teachers in the Rubber Room

  RIP Justine and Yves Sergent

  Post-9/11 incursions on profs' jobs


Peltzing in Arkansas
(New Orleans, AALS, 2010)


32 Instructive Cases, 2005-2010

Two Leftists Mobbed at Medaille (PDF)

Hammerly's Posthumous Analysis
Westhues Response to Hammerly

  Agenda: Update Upton Sinclair

 Defensible Eliminations 

In Targets' Own Words
Alan Gribben, Texas-Austin
Russ Stratton, Alaska-Fairbanks
A Former Department Chair

James A. Coan, U Washington
(See Tavris on Loftus & Guyer)
Marc DePree, Southern Miss

  The Westhues Case —
Self-Study and Documents

Kenneth Westhues
Professor Emeritus of Sociology
University of Waterloo, Canada
June 2014

POLICY RECOMMENDATIONS





THE HAMMERLY LECTURES
1
2
3
*

 Sham Peer Review in Medicine

MOBBING VERSUS BULLYING

Self-test: Which Interests You More, Mobbing or Bullying?

Critiques of the Anti-Bullying Movement (Montreal, 08)

Ten Choices in Research (Dublin, 06)





Online, free! 12 recent articles

For Research Specialists:
60 scholarly articles, 2006-2014




SPECIFIC INFO FOR
 



Konrad Lorenz
Nobel Laureate
Physiiology/
Medicine
1973

Origins of the Study of Workplace Mobbing

In his book entitled On Aggression (1966), Konrad Lorenz (1903-1989), the Austrian-German founder of ethology, described mobbing among birds and animals, attributing it to instincts rooted in the Darwinian struggle to survive. In his view, we humans are subject to similar innate impulses but capable of bringing them under rational control.

In the 1970s, the Swedish physician Peter-Paul Heinemann applied Lorenz's conceptualization to the collective aggression of children against a targeted child. In the 1980s, German-Swedish psychologist Heinz Leymann (1932-1999) applied the term to ganging up in the workplace.


Quotations that capture some of what workplace mobbing means:

Turning and turning in the widening gyre
The falcon cannot hear the falconer;
Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold;
Mere anarchy is loosed upon the world,
The blood-dimmed tide is loosed, and everywhere
The ceremony of innocence is drowned;
The best lack all conviction, while the worst
Are full of passionate intensity.

— William B. Yeats, 1920

And we also pray that we may be considered candidly and aright by the living sufferers as being then under the power of a strong and general delusion, utterly unacquainted with and not experienced in matters of that nature.

— The jurors of Salem, MA, in 1697, five years after finding 150 men and women guilty of witchcraft

You read your history and you'll see that from time to time people in every country have seemed to lose their good sense, got hysterical, and got off the beam. . . . I don't know what gets into people.

— U.S. President Harry Truman, in M. Miller, Plain Speaking (Berkley Medallion 1974, p. 447).

There are strange games played,
and careers unmade,
In the quest for wisdom's pearl;
There are tales of power,
In the ivory tower,
That can make your toenails curl.

— pace Robert Service

IF you can keep your head when all about you
Are losing theirs and blaming it on you,
If you can trust yourself when all men doubt you,
But make allowance for their doubting too;
If you can wait and not be tired by waiting,
Or being lied about, don't deal in lies,
Or being hated, don't give way to hating,
And yet don't look too good, nor talk too wise:

If you can dream - and not make dreams your master;
If you can think - and not make thoughts your aim;
If you can meet with Triumph and Disaster
And treat those two impostors just the same;
If you can bear to hear the truth you've spoken
Twisted by knaves to make a trap for fools,
Or watch the things you gave your life to, broken,
And stoop and build 'em up with worn-out tools:

From Rudyard Kipling's "If," 1896

Hide! Hide! Witch!
The good folks come to burn thee,
their keen enjoyment hid behind
a gothic mask of duty.

- Mark Clifton, 1953